Orientalism and the Jews (Tauber Institute for the Study of European Jewry) by Derek J. Penslar

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Author
Derek J. Penslar
Publisher
Brandeis University Press
Date of release
Pages
328
ISBN
9781584654100
Binding
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
3
34

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Orientalism and the Jews (Tauber Institute for the Study of European Jewry)

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Book review

In spite of growing globalization there remains in the world a split between the West and the rest. The manner in which this split has been imagined and represented in Western civilization has been the subject of intense cross-disciplinary scrutiny, much of it under the rubric of "orientalism." This debate, sparked by the 1978 publication of Bdward Said's Orientalism identifies the "Orient" as the Islamic world and to a lesser extent Hindu India. "Orientalism" signifies the way the West imagined this terrain. Going beyond Said's framework, Kalmar and Penslar argue that orientalism is based on the Christian West's attempts to understand its relations with both its monotheistic Others - Muslims and Jews. According to the editors, Jews have almost always been present whenever occidentals imagined the East; and the Western image of the Muslim Orient continues to be formed in conjunction with Western perceptions of the Jewish people. Bringing together essays by an array of international scholars in a wide range of disciplines, Orientalism and the Jews opens exciting new fields in Jewish history and Post-Colonial studies.


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